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(showing articles 181 to 183 of 183)
(showing articles 181 to 183 of 183)

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Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy. In her reporting, Fessler covers homelessness, hunger, and the impact of the recession on the nation's less fortunate. She reports on non-profit groups, how they're trying to address poverty and other social issues, and how they've been affected by the economic downturn. Her poverty reporting was recognized by a 2011 First Place Headliner Award in the human interest category. Previously, Fessler reported primarily on homeland security, including security at U.S. ports, airlines, and borders. She has also reported on the government's response to Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 Commission investigation, and such issues as Social Security and election reform. Fessler was also one of NPR's White House reporters during the Clinton and Bush administrations. Before becoming a correspondent, Fessler was the acting senior editor on the Washington Desk and oversaw the network's coverage of the

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    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Now it's time for our regular segment Words You'll Hear. That's where we take a word or phrase that will be in the news this week and try to understand it by focusing on that word. This week, our word is spear-phishing. That's when a hacker tricks somebody by sending an email allegedly from somebody the target knows and trusts but with malicious software. The target sees an email from a friend or colleague, opens up the infected attachment and bam, the hacker is in. That's one of the strategies that Russia is believed to have used to try to influence the U.S. elections last fall. Next week, both the House and the Senate will hold hearings to look into this. For more, we turn now to NPR's Pam Fessler, who just got back from a couple of conferences with state and local election officials last week. Hi, Pam. PAM FESSLER, BYLINE: Hi, how you doing? MARTIN: Good. So can you give us an overview of the alleged spear-phishing campaign

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    The Florida elections vendor that was targeted in Russian cyberattacks last year has denied a recent report based on a leaked National Security Agency document that the company's computer system was compromised. The hackers tried to break into employee email accounts last August but were unsuccessful, said Ben Martin, the chief operating officer of VR Systems, in an interview with NPR. Martin said the hackers appeared to be trying to steal employee credentials in order to launch a spear-phishing campaign aimed at the company's customers. VR Systems, based in Tallahassee, Fla., provides voter registration software and hardware to elections offices in eight states. "Some emails came into our email account that we did not open. Even though NSA says it's likely that we opened them, we did not," Martin says. "We know for a fact they were never opened. They did not get into our domain." Instead, Martin said, the company isolated the suspicious emails and alerted law enforcement authorities,

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    Russia's efforts to interfere with last year's elections will be front and center during two hearings on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson will appear before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence while the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence will hear from current U.S. intelligence officials and state election experts. Here are five questions likely to be on lawmakers' minds as they listen to witnesses and ask questions. 1. How extensive were Russian efforts to hack into U.S. election systems last year? Right now, it's not clear but here's what we know so far. Last June, the FBI alerted Arizona election officials that a known Russian hacker had gained access to a county employee's username and password and that someone using those credentials tried to gain access to the state's voter registration database. That effort did not appear to be successful. In July, a computer expert working for the Illinois State Board of

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